Gita Bourbonnais

Diabetic Foot Pain Treatment

What Is Mortons Neuroma

Overview

plantar neuromaDuring certain activities, particularly weight-bearing activities (e.g. walking or running) a compressive force, is sometimes placed on the interdigital nerves and surrounding soft tissue, between the metatarsal bones (this is often the case with tight fitting shoes or in patients with flat feet). If this force is repetitive enough and beyond what the nerve and soft tissue can withstand, swelling to the nerve and soft tissue may occur. This may result in pain, tenderness, pins and needles or numbness in the forefoot or toes. When this happens, the condition is known as a Morton's neuroma.

Causes

Unfortunately, the cause of Morton?s Neuroma remains unknown to researchers. It is likely that a variety of factors may play a role in the development of this condition, including the presence of chronic pain conditions like fibromyalgia. Factors that may contribute to the development of Morton?s Neuroma include Wearing improperly fitting shoes can cause pressure on your foot, leading to swelling around the toe nerves. High heels are of particular concern as they cause a large amount of weight to be shifted to the ball of the foot. Repetitive activities like jogging, walking, and aerobics can also place a lot of pressure on the feet. This could lead to Morton?s Neuroma. Having a previous foot or muscle injury may cause you to hold your foot in a poor position when walking, contributing to nerve inflammation. Some people are just born with poorly shaped feet. People with extremely low arches or "flat feet" may suffer from Morton?s Neuroma more than others.

Symptoms

Patients will often experience a clicking feeling in the forefoot followed by a sharp shooting pain or a sensation of numbness or pins and needles extending into ends of their toes. Tight narrow fitting shoes may often exacerbate these feelings which become worse after long periods of standing or walking. Once the Mortons nueroma progresses symptoms will become more frequent and often more intense.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will suspect that you have a Morton's neuroma based on the nature and location of your foot pain. He or she may ask questions about your shoes - what type of shoes you usually wear and whether these shoes have narrow toes or high heels. To rule out other causes of foot pain, your doctor may ask questions about your medical history, especially any history of arthritis, nerve and muscle problems or previous injury to your foot or leg.

Non Surgical Treatment

The best results are achieved with massage techniques that encourage spreading and mobilizing the metatarsal heads. Metatarsal spreading is one technique that can help reduce the detrimental effects of nerve compression. To perform this technique, pull the metatarsal heads (not just the toes) apart and hold them in this position to help stretch the intrinsic foot muscles and other soft-tissues. When this technique is combined with the use of toe spacers, it will be even more effective.intermetatarsal neuroma

Surgical Treatment

If conservative treatment does not relieve your symptoms, your orthopaedic surgeon may discuss surgical treatment options with you. Surgery can resect a small portion of the nerve or release the tissue around the nerve, and generally involves a short recovery period.
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